A Conversation With Speculative Fiction Author Nina Allan

Nina

Nina Allan’s Desert Island book is Iris Murdoch’s The Book and the Brotherhood. “There is something exalted about her work, a sense of heightened reality that shines a light on ordinary objects and occurrences and reveals their hidden magic – and madness.”

Award-winning author Nina Allan had fifty published short stories to her name before she wrote her first novel, The Race. This debut novel was shortlisted for the Arthur C Clarke Award. Her novella Spin won the BSFA Award for short fiction, and the French translation of The Silver Wind won the Grand Prix de L’imaginaire.

I’m delighted that Nina joins me today in a conversation about the writing process, touchstone influences and our writing quests!

Here goes—

ANNE: Recently I read Stephen King’s On Writing and although he gives great advice throughout, I was curious about one of his comments on the subject of theme. He feels that the theme of a novel is something that emerges in the first draft or after the first draft, and can then be enhanced in subsequent reworking. But for me the theme, or concept, comes first, before I start outlining and plotting a piece of fiction. How do you view the importance of theme? Does it vary from one writing project to another? Read more

Update: The Independent, Historical Novel Society and more

It’s been a while since I posted here because I’ve been in the writing cave, scribbling away at the next novel. Here’s a quick catch-up. 

The very talented author Tricia Sullivan used the launch of her latest novel, Occupy Me, as an opportunity to promote four new science fiction writers, including yours truly. So generous! I ‘m totally delighted that Tricia interviewed me as part of the research for her recent article in The Independent. The interview appears in full on the Gollancz blog. Great questions! Tricia also interviewed Emma Newman, Karen Lord and Stephanie Saulter. Read more